T.O. 2.0? Not Even Close

By John Camera

The prodigal son returned. Odell Beckham Jr. was back at the Giant’s practice facility last week for mandatory team OTAs and if you listened to much of the mainstream media, you would think Beckham was holding out and threatening not to play until he got a new contract. Beckham is going into the fourth year of a four year rookie contract with a fifth year option that the Giants have already picked up. During interviews, Beckham committed himself to his teammates and to playing, noting that his absence at voluntary mini-camp had nothing to do with his quest for a new deal despite what anyone said, wrote, or tweeted.

Still, since Beckham achieved super stardom quickly into his 2014 rookie campaign, the spotlight has followed the young Wide Receiver for better and for worse. In this case, it has been negative, Beckham’s absence from New Jersey overshadowing other players who decided not to show up for their team’s voluntary practices, including his teammate and fellow blue-chip player Defensive End Olivier Vernon.

With all this noise about Beckham, his contract, and practice, the New York sports media has a wealth of stories to publish based on these rumors that attract readers with a big-name during the deadest part of the NFL off-season. And in the wake of it, one media and fan-driven storyline has been dredged back up from its ugly depths; Odell Beckham is a diva and locker room cancer akin to Terrell Owens.

Beckham hasn’t exactly been a quiet player since achieving his near-immediate fame, enjoying the lime light while fellow stud receivers like Julio Jones shy away from it. But there’s a big difference between being a loud mouth and being a distraction. Detractors of Beckham’s and supporters of the latter point to Beckham’s issues with Josh Norman, and while Beckham escalated things in their infamous 2015 clash, many leave out that Norman initiated the cheap shots and Beckham held back greatly in 2016.

Other issues that have cropped in Beckham’s career include sideline explosions against Tampa and Carolina in 2015 as well as 2016’s incidents against Washington, Minnesota, and the kicking net. Opponents of Beckham’s, not just Norman but other Cornerbacks like then-Bills’ CB Stephon Gilmore have accused him of being a prima donna, cheap shot artist, and generally an annoyance.

Perhaps the biggest piece of evidence Beckham fed critics was his much-publicized boat excursion with fellow Giants’ Wide Receivers as well as Justin Bieber and Trey Songz. Their next game, a Wild Card matchup against Green Bay, saw the Giants’ receiving corps, and Beckham in particular, rack up drop after drop. Those who see Odell Beckham as an antagonist to his team are fair in using these examples in their argument but more often than not, choose to ignore or conveniently leave out what makes Beckham a great teammate and locker room leader.

A scan of several Giants’ Snapchat stories, including Jason Pierre-Paul, Sterling Shepard, and Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie, shows Beckham joking and interacting with his teammates in a positive manner. One in particular depicts Beckham showing DRC a particular dance and another centered on Beckham and Defensive Tackle Jay Bromley having a dance battle. Beckham is not just a guy who sticks to his teammates on offense but seems to get along with everyone on his team.

Beckham is also not a player who is ever content or satisfied with what he has done. His first three seasons have been the best of any receiver in NFL history. And yet, he is still always working at his craft. Beckham trained in the offseason with Vikings Hall of Famer Chris Carter and has discussed how new acquisition Brandon Marshall has given him tips he can take and adapt to his own game.

While some of the things Odell Beckham does has attracted negative attention to himself and his team, Beckham has been an important player both on the field and in the locker room for the New York Giants. He has been a franchise-changing player, perhaps the biggest star the Giants’ have drafted since Lawrence Taylor in 1981. Don’t let anyone tell you Beckham is a locker room divider ala Terrell Owens; they simply aren’t telling the whole truth.

Chiefs The Biggest Winners of 2017 NFL Draft

By John Camera

It may not look like it on the surface but the biggest winners of the 2017 NFL Draft were the Kansas City Chiefs. They improved their present team, a serious Super Bowl contender, and improved themselves long-term with their addition of their franchise QB of the future. And this future may not be that far away with Andy Reid coaching up their young buck.

That future star? Of course Mr. Pat Mahomes II, the stud Quarterback from Texas Tech whom the Chiefs traded up a whopping 17 spots in the first round to acquire. They didn’t give up a lot considering his floor is Matt Stafford and ceiling is Brett Favre. Kansas City traded their first, third, and first rounder in 2018 to move up to number ten overall. Considering this is a playoff team regularly picking at the bottom of the first round, this isn’t a bad deal whatsoever.

I won’t sugarcoat it; I’m enamored with Mahomes. A smart, athletic, QB with the astounding natural accuracy he has is rare. His footwork at Tech was awful and he still threw darts that were perfectly placed. Being able to be under the tutelage of Andy Reid and the anti-Mahomes, Alex Smith, and settle in as the backup with no pressure right away, is a path to long-term success. We will look back on this trade in a decade and realize what a great one it was for Kansas City, I’m confident of that.

Rounding out the rest of their draft, the Chiefs came in with a boatload of picks and used them well, being aggressive and consolidating to get premium players in trade ups. In the third round, they traded up 18 spots to grab Toledo RB Kareem Hunt, who I liked almost as much as Mahomes. If Hunt keeps his weight steady at the NFL level, his well-rounded ability will make him a long-term starter in the mold of Frank Gore. I wouldn’t be surprised one bit if he stole Spencer Ware’s starting job, while still splitting carries with him, and completely overshadowed Charcandrick West.

Rewinding a bit, the Chiefs used their second round pick on small-school wild card Tanoh Kpassagnon, a Defensive End from Villanova. I expect the Chiefs will fit him next to Chris Jones at 5-tech 3-4 DE but he might get some reps at OLB considering Tamba Hali’s age. With all the talent around him on the Chiefs defense, I think Kpassagnon comes into an ideal situation where he won’t need to be a defensive stalwart right away.

On day three, the Chiefs made several picks that greatly helped their overall depth. Jehu Chesson was a big-play threat at Michigan and could easily develop into a number three or four Wide Receiver in an average Kansas City receiving corps. He was a great value pick-up. In the fifth the Linebacker from Georgia Southern, Ukeme Eligwe, was the selection. Eligwe has big-time talent, originally an FSU signee who moved on to GSU while dealing with off-the-field and injury issues. If he can remain on the field at the next level, Eligwe has the size, speed, and physicality to contribute as an Inside LB backup and special teams standout. The Chiefs last pick was Southern California Safety Leon McQuay III. McQuay is a little lean for the Safety position but he has the speed and ball-skills to be a competent backup and should contribute immediately on special teams.

What To Do At Number Two?

By John Camera

The San Francisco 49ers have a franchise-changing decision to make at pick number two in the 2017 NFL Draft. Presuming the Cleveland Browns make the right choice and go with All-World Texas A&M defensive end Myles Garrett, the 9ers will have a litany of players worth taking at two but no one is the clear second-best player in the class after Garrett. They could continue to bolster their defense, making it their 5th straight year of adding a first round talent to their defense, with potential stalwarts like Solomon Thomas, Marshon Lattimore, Malik Hooker, and Jamal Adams. Unfortunately their defensive selections haven’t fixed a defense that lost so much, so quickly with a slew of sudden retirements a couple years ago.

Their 2013 1st rounder, Eric Reid, never lived up to his potential at LSU and is still an over-aggressive, poor tackler who isn’t great in coverage. In 2014, they selected Jimmie Ward, who’s been a solid nickel back, a hybrid between slot corner and free safety, but hasn’t been a difference maker. 2015 pick Arik Armstead has been hampered by injuries and may make a move to SAM Linebacker. 2016 pick DeForest Buckner is easily the best of the bunch and looks to be a defensive pillar for years to come. The 9ers could add another one next to him in the young and still-developing DL terror that is Stanford’s Solomon Thomas. Thomas can play the DE spot in the 9ers revamped 4-3 defense and shift inside on passing downs to work next to Buckner.

San Francisco can also look to add reinforcements to a secondary that badly needs it. Starting Corner Traimane Brock is out and the aforementioned underwhelming draft picks the 49ers took in 2013 and 2014 still leave a lot to be desired. San Francisco could look to add Ohio State CB Marshon Lattimore who could team with last year’s reclamation project Rashard Robinson, who had a very promising rookie year in his first action since 2014 (he was formerly kicked off the LSU football squad). Lattimore would give San Fran a huge upgrade at CB and create a young Cornerback corp that could be very good in a short time along with Robinson and Ward. They could look to add a play-making ball hawk at Free Safety, adding Malik Hooker to their defense and letting him patrol the middle of the field. Finally, the 49ers could select LSU’s Jamal Adams and bring on a high-character Safety who could ideally play FS, SS, and even a little CB. Most draft pundits seem to pigeonhole him as a SS but I believe he has enough speed to stick at Free.

While defense is likely the pick, San Francisco could also look to add an offensive player to kickstart the struggling unit. Runningback Leonard Fournette would be an upgrade over the injury prone Carlos Hyde and could give the 49ers a formidable tandem that could run over opposing defenses. However, the last pick that is possible but I would highly recommend they don’t make, is selecting UNC Quarterback Mitchell Trubisky. Trubisky is a fine Quarterback, and after some time could very well become a solid NFL starter in the right situation. And while new HC Kyle Shanahan figures to be in the market for a new QB with Colin Kaepernick gone, he shouldn’t take a boom or bust prospect when he can grab a true difference maker from day one with this pick.

Don’t Believe the Hype: Davis Webb Is Not A First Rounder

By John Camera

The NFL Draft hype machine is whirring and churning with the most ridiculous takes you’ve heard this off-season as General Managers continue to throw smokescreens. Chief among them is the idea that California QB prospect Davis Webb is a first round caliber player and will ultimately go in the first 32 selections come April 27th. Just like Tom Savage in 2014 and Matt Barkley in 2013, Webb is getting extreme, unwarranted hype merely for looking like the prototypical pocket passer that has been the standard for NFL teams since the advent of the forward pass. Tall? Check. Big arm? Check. Can he throw? Eh. Maybe.

Davis Webb is by no means a horrible prospect, he just isn’t a first round caliber talent and is, frankly, far from it. He does some things very well. He does have great size and arm strength and has really good accuracy in the short and deep areas of the field. Webb also does a lot more field-reading than most spread QBs, especially those in an “Air Raid” scheme like the one he runs. He generally gets rid of the ball quickly and doesn’t allow himself to take drive-killing sacks. Those are some of the positives to his game and they shape up to equal a Quarterback who is likely a very good back-up or, down the line, a serviceable spot starter. He is by no means the “savior” or franchise QB that so many teams covet.

There are also a great deal of weaknesses that will hold Webb back from being a legit first round talent like the hype train is trying to sell. His accuracy in the middle area of the field from about 10-20 yards past the line of scrimmage, isn’t very good. He doesn’t consistently drive the ball to where his receiver can make the catch and keep running, instead often putting it on the back shoulder or too far wide. Even more concerning is Webb’s pocket presence, especially since he isn’t a great athlete. Webb looks uncomfortable even in a clean pocket, failing to step up and often trying to escape. If there’s an inside rush, he breaks down altogether. His footwork is also a big work in progress, as Webb often doesn’t bring his hip all the way around to complete his throw.

As Public Enemy reminds us, “don’t believe the hype,” especially when it comes to late draft-season proclamations that seem out of the blue considering what we had been hearing all along. Davis Webb is not a first round QB. He is a fourth round talent who could one day start but likely will have a lengthy career as a dependable backup. And there’s nothing wrong with that.

UNC’s Small Receiver with a Big Skill-Set

By John Camera

Ryan Switzer doesn’t look like the next great slot prospect entering the NFL in 2017. He measured in at 5’8″, 158 pounds, and only ran a 4.51 40 at the Combine. And while all of that matters, it takes a back seat when analyzing Switzer. The UNC Wideout doesn’t use size or speed to beat college, and soon to be NFL, CBs. He uses his fantastic quickness.

Switzer was one of the Combine’s top performers at his position in the 20 yard shuttle, illustrating he has some of the best quickness of any receiver in this draft class. It’s evident how he uses that shake in his route running, he’s able to get excellent separation because he can change direction with such ease that it often leaves his Corner in a trail position. To boot, Switzer is also a superb route-runner, consistently showing hip explosion in his breaks and overall crispness throughout his routes. That quickness and attention to detail makes Switzer a deadly option coming out of the slot for NFL Nickel Corners to try and defend against.

As mentioned earlier, Switzer won’t win many footraces against NFL CBs. However, he is more than fast enough to gain separation and be a great YAC (yards after catch) option. He probably won’t be able to finish plays and DBs should be able to track him down on plays where he gets into the open field, but don’t underestimate how his quickness, route-running, and reliable hands will quickly gain the favor of what Quarterback is lucky enough to have him.

 

Can Dalvin Cook Keep Up His Explosive Play in the NFL?

By Alexander C. Lawrence

NCAA Football Player Profile – Dalvin Cook, Running back

School: Florida State
Year:
Junior
Height: 5’11
Weight:
213lbs

A 5-star recruited back who originally committed to Clemson and then to Florida, but after a disappointing season from Florida, Cook believed it was best to fully commit to Florida State University. In his first season he split carries with Karlos Williams (Steelers, suspended), but would eventually take over as the lead back and had a spectacular career at FSU.

One of the hot topics in the NFL Draft will be Dalvin Cook and LSU’s Leonard Fournette, who are arguably the top two backs in a class of RBs that has a lot of potential. If you’re looking for speed, great cuts, and great pass-catching look no further than Cook. He’s been an explosive RB ever since he got to FSU. He has the ability to beat you as a receiver too and proved to be a productive back on third-down throughout his time at FSU. He may not have the overall strength that Fournette does, but Cook makes it difficult for defenders to tackle him with his lower body strength. He showed skills to be an every down back and can handle a lot of touches. Another thing that is exciting about Cook is that he often shines in the biggest games. He’s a back who can break-off for huge runs at any given time.

Cook has the ability to run with a strong presence at times, but will need to look to do it on a more consistent basis in the NFL. When he gets to the NFL he’ll need that consistency because of the difference in NFL defender compared to college.

The other concerns about Cook are his hands and off the field concerns. His first two seasons at FSU he had fumbling issues, but this season he had better grip on the ball. In July, 2015 he was arrested for an incident outside of a bar which a month later he was found not guilty. Whenever a player gets in trouble, scouts take note of that. In his case I don’t think it’ll affect him too much in terms of draft stock, but something to note going forward.

Pros:

  • Good speed and explosion
  • Has ability to be a star back
  • Quick-cuts
  • Can be an effective receiving back
  • Can block when asked
  • Productive on third-down
  • Big play making ability

Cons:

  • July 2015 bar incident
  • Fumble concerns
  • Must run tough more consistently

When you watch Dalvin Cook play you see a speedy back with a dynamic punch. He can be a workhorse back and whoever gets him can put him to work right away. A few teams I can see drafting Cook would be the Panthers, Giants, or Packers. I highly doubt the Buccaneers could pass up a Cook and Winston reunion. Teams that have established QBs would be getting a nice weapon to add to their offense.

Draft projection: 1st round

Comparison: Clinton Portis

 

Looking For A Big-Arm Gunslinger? His Name is Chad Kelly

By Alexander C. Lawrence

NCAA Football Player Profile – Chad Kelly, Quarterback

School: Ole Miss
Year:
Senior
Height: 6’2
Weight:
224lbs

Chad Kelly started his career off at Clemson in 2012, a former four-star recruit who was redshirted his first year. His time at Clemson would be cut short in 2013 after he appeared in 5 games. In April 2014 he was kicked off the team for detrimental conduct, he went on to East Mississippi Community College and had an outstanding year. He then transferred to play for Ole Miss where he played tough competition and proved he can win those big moment games in 2015, his first year as a starter there. In 2016 his season was cut short as he led Ole Miss to a disappointing 4-5 record before he suffered a torn ACL which ultimately ended his college career.

When you watch Chad Kelly play his junior year in which he had a good supporting cast around him and a stud WR in Laquan Treadwell, you see why he was a top recruit and why Clemson believed in him. Unfortunately due to coaching conflicts and other behaviors Kelly showed while on the team he was never able to showcase his talent. You do however; see that throughout his nine games he played his senior year that he  he did play well even if his team’s record didn’t indicate that. He displayed great confidence against some of his tougher opponents this season.

Kelly will get a chance to shape his NFL career differently. He can’t change the past but can convince teams he’s a better person. He has what you like to see talent wise, but being a distraction will usually cost you your career. Look at Johnny Football and Randy Gregory who did little to help their team so far and yes their careers aren’t over, but the more off the field issues you have the less patience a team will have. Kelly also displayed serious potential to be an NFL starter with the talent he has.

Pros:

  • He can compete against elite college programs
  • Throws confidently from the pocket
  • Has arm talent and strength
  • Quick release
  • Cam adjust to defensive schemes well
  • He doesn’t stare down one target

Cons:

  • Torn ACL in November 2016
  • Off the field issues
  • Play is too frantic at times
  • Must learn to play under center in NFL

When you watch his overall performance at Ole Miss he did play pretty well and proved he can compete against anyone. That being said he’s had issues with being frustrated with coaches’ decisions and voices his opinion which is what some will argue was a reason he was dismissed from the Clemson football program. I don’t see a guy who’s a huge team problem in terms of his behavior, just a guy who loves the game of football. He needs to control his excitement for the game and stay out of trouble. Every scout will be asking “Can we trust Chad Kelly to stay out of trouble?” and “Will our coach have issues with him?” That’s yet to be determined, but if he can obviously develop his overall skill set with all the talent he has. If loses these off the field issues we could see a solid starter emerge. He’s set the foundation for his career and he reacts and answers to reports and scouts questions will greatly factor in if a team drafts him.

Draft projection: 4th round

Comparison: Rex Grossman